Sunrise over Lake Massasoit
Lessons from Graduate Study: Make Self-Care a Priority

When thinking about what I could contribute to the Springfield College blog, the first thing that popped into my mind was self-care. If I learned anything from my first-year graduate study (outside of school work, that is) it was the importance of self-care and how it contributes to the overall success of your graduate career.

Though this may sound like a no brainer, I often found myself struggling to make time for myself. With classes, work, group work, social life, and the tasks of “adulting,” self-care became just another item on my weekly/monthly “to do” list. But self-care should not be an item on a “to-do list”— it should be a part of an everyday lifestyle. I had to figure this out the hard way and, to be honest, I am still learning.

Self-care can be practiced in many ways and is different for every person. The fun part is finding out what contributes to your self-care. For me, it changes and depends on what I have going on in regards to my schedule as well as my budget (#gradlife). Self-care can take up a full day or maybe just 10 minutes. It is all about spending time for and with yourself to create a positive space. I don’t have much time during the day so one of my quick self-care activities is simply dancing along to a favorite playlist that gets my energy flowing. It feels good, it’s active, and it is a moment for me to escape my busy life. Other self care practices that can be beneficial to students can be: exercising, meditating, reading, listening to music or a podcast (one of my favorites), art, catching up on a TV show/movie, taking a nap, having a favorite treat or meal, or listing 10 things for which you are grateful. These small efforts can truly change the trajectory of the day and overall wellness of life.

Making time for self-care and making it a part of your everyday life can shape your overall graduate study.

It can help keep you grounded during the hustle and bustle. As a graduate student, I’ve sometimes felt like I was in over my head with a never-ending to-do list. Self-care would be at the very bottom of that list because I had so many other deadlines to meet. Eventually, I realized that self-care shouldn’t be hard or a chore, it is important for the overall health of our spirit, mind, and body. Once again, the fun part is finding what works for you and turning self-care from a “task” to a lifestyle. It truly makes a difference in your graduate career.

Springfield College Resources for Self-Care

Women stretching in a fitness class.
Sweat off the stress at the Wellness and Recreation Complex

Take a class, climb the rock wall, lift weights, swim some laps, get in some cardio—exercise is scientifically proven to increase your endorphins, which triggers positive feelings. The Wellness and Recreation Complex is a great resource for working on your physical and mental health. 

A man in a canoe.
Spend some time in nature at East Campus

Sometimes self-care means spending some time with nature. As a Springfield College student, you’re invited to take advantage of the resources at East Campus— 57 acres of forestland and is bordered by a mile of shorefront on Lake Massasoit.

Graduate students pose while sitting at a table on east campus
Join a club

Fit something fun into your schedule. Give yourself something to look forward to by joining a club or campus organization. This a great way to socialize, pursue an interest, and focus on something other than academics. For example, our Graduate Student Organization is designed specifically with you in mind!

watercolor abstract
Make an appointment at our Counseling Center

There’s no need to struggle alone. If stress is really getting to you, or issues outside of school start to crop up, there is no better resource than seeking professional help. Springfield College offers an onsite Counseling Center to help you get through tough times, or just to talk every once in a while!

Interested in graduate study at Springfield College? Take the next steps: 

Learn MoreApply

About the author

Natasha Corbin, G' 19

Boston, MA

My name is Natasha “Tash” Corbin. I am a second year graduate student in the Therapeutic Recreation program at Springfield College. I received my B.S in Exercise and Sport Science at Coastal Carolina University. I graduate in December, and my overall career goal is to open a program for individuals living with mental health disorders. My favorite hobbies are dancing, cooking, and traveling!