Students learn how to learn from engaging with their peers and being able to do that in an environment that’s welcoming and comfortable. Frankly, I think it’s the wave of the future. Tony Poindexter '93
Tony Poindexter '93

Wave of the Future

Why an alumni couple decided to support the Harold C. Smith Learning Commons, and what it means for their daughter

It started in Babson Library. That is where Tony Poindexter ’93, MD, was sitting when he looked out the window and saw a familiar face, his future wife, Lori ’93, walking into the Alden Street building. His former high school acquaintance was in the process of transferring to Springfield College on that day. 

Before long they were dating. In a matter of time, they got married in the campus chapel and began raising a family together.

More than two decades after graduating, Tony and Lori watched as Babson Library transformed into the Harold C. Smith Learning Commons. They also watched as it transformed the learning experience of their daughter, Sara ’19.

Tony and Lori decided to make a leadership-level gift to the Harold C. Smith Learning Commons, knowing its value to a twenty-first century education and how much Sara would benefit.

“Students learn how to learn from engaging with their peers and being able to do that in an environment that’s welcoming and comfortable. Frankly, I think it’s the wave of the future,” Tony said of the Learning Commons.

As an undergraduate, Tony was a sports biology major. He now works as a physician. Like her father, Sara also majored in sports biology and is pursuing a career in the medical field as she completes requirements toward becoming a physician assistant.

“I know how hard the major is, and I know that her experience was more comfortable than mine because of the Learning Commons. There were more opportunities for her to engage and study together in groups and use the resources that are available, which were light years ahead of what we had,” said Tony.

Although their son, Alex, decided to transfer to a different school, he too spent his first year at Tony and Lori’s alma mater.

“We had the opportunity to see both of them wear the beanie. It was kind of neat seeing how the philosophy has been passed down to our children. They’re better people for it,” said Tony.

The Poindexters plan to stay engaged with the College, including Tony teaching part-time in the physician assistant program. With luck, their youngest daughter will continue the family tradition and be wearing her beanie when the time is right.